A large possibly exist Georgia murdered a innocent man, as Troy Davis is executed


An Reach Out Job Search Op/Ed


Photo Credit-Truthinjustice.org
Troy Davis (Lower Left white jumpsuit)
picture with members of his family,

We have our share of issues in Michigan. A run-away Republican Legislator whose actions like Public Act #4 and Public Act #98,leave questions after their passage into laws, of the framework that our state Constitution founded.


Governor Rick Snyder has signed both of these measures and many more bills into law, including the strict force removal of 12,000 women their children off of state public assistance programs after 48 months. 


Our growing unemployment rate of 11.2% has left over 500,000 Michiganders jobless and seeking work, during insecure and uncertain times.

For all Michigan problems, one mechanism this state refuse to condone are state endorsed murders, whether guilty or proven innocent. 


Michigan is one of 15 correct states, who doesn’t have a death penalty statue on its’ law books. Take a trip to the Southeast or Southwest of this state and assassination of individuals “found guilty” in court of murder surround us in Ohio, Indianaand Illinois.

In 1846, Michigan was the first English speaking states’ to abolish the death penalty, except in cases of Treason of the state. The state Constitution written in 1963, confirmed in 1964, forbid use of execution for another human life in any case, even mass murder(s). 


Michigan elected officials of the 1960’s wrote in clear and concise language firm disagreement with “the death penalty” ever being enacted in Michigan.
The outlaw of state court ordered homicide, came to existence after nearly making a ultimate mistake, of taking an innocent life.

In 1846, a condemned murderer awaiting execution at Michigan’s new prison in Jackson was pardoned after a death-bed confession of the real killer showed he falsely convicted of the crime. March 1, 1847, Michigan Legislation reversed its’ criminal statues, providing life imprisonment for murders, instead of death.

Individuals, who believe that death by lethal injection is the right move for Michigan, have tried a number of times to overturn the ban.

By 1956, over a decade after the states’ ban, Michigan’s House or Senate separately voted eight times for capital punishment during the twentieth century. Both chambers couldn’t agree bill language for the death penalty to reach the Governors’ desk for signature.

In 2004, a 55-52 vote in Michigan state House, was 18 legislators short of the 2/3rd vote needed to send the measure to the Senate. The resolution would have considered changing the state constitution to approving in 1st-degree murder cases, state-ordered death, in convicted criminal action that there’s absolutely no doubt about a defendant’s guilt.

To overturn any statue of Michigan’s state Constitution, a referendum petition initiative must be successful, to place a vote affirming a will of a majority of citizens. Four statewide petition drives over the years tried, but failed, repeal the constitutional ban.

Troy Davis was executed on September 21st, 2011, behalf of “the people” in the state of Georgia. 


Seven of the nine eyewitnesses during 1991 criminal trial of Davis recantedoriginal testimony, accusing him of murder of off-duty Savannah, Georgia police officer Mark MacPhail. For the other two who refused to change their stories, one of them Sylvester “Redd” Coles, has admitted to the murder.

Coles, who was at the scene according to witnesses, ditched a gun of the same caliber as the murder weapon on the night Office MacPhail was slain.  The other non-recanting “eye-witness” initially told investigators that he couldn’t identify the killer. Nearly two years later, at the trial, he surprisingly “gained his memory” and testified that the killer was Mr. Davis.

If time could be turned back to August 19, 1991, utopia result would be Officer MacPhail completed his security guard shift without incident, and returned home to his family. 

Hindsight being 20/20 if Troy Davis was convicted of MacPhail’s murder in Michigan, Davis would be alive today and able to prove his claims of innocence.

“I’d like to address the MacPhail family. Let you know, despite the situation you are in, I’m not the one who personally killed your son, your father, your brother. I am innocent,” Troy Davis stated in his last words to the MacPhail family at the execution.

‘The incident that happened that night is not my fault. I did not have a gun. All I can ask … is that you look deeper into this case so that you really can finally see the truth. I ask my family and friends to continue to fight this fight,” Davis state. 

“For those about to take my life, God have mercy on your souls. And may God bless your souls.”

Whether if murder is state-approved or occur on behalf of a criminal with a gun, once the action is completed, it cannot be undone. Let us hope that Georgia didn’t execute Davis, then evidence there-after proves him not-guilty of taking MacPhil life, as a mistake this grave is truly unforgivable.


Maybe then Officer MacPhail’s family, who was reported to have smiled and cheered after Davis was executed, could muster up heart felt apology to Troy Davis surviving relatives.

As a Michigan resident, solace exist in my mind knowing no state resident will never leave this Earth for false “justice” that exist in a “eye-for-a-eye” mentally of state signed and approved murder. 

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